Subtle Storm

Are you intriqued with gentle storms and peaceful feelings, brilliant colors and happy places? I’d like to share something a little different with you because this painting was created in a different  kind of way for me. I like the final product, it was experimental and creative combining different aspects of how and why I did what I did. I also thought you might like to see the three process pictures. I don’t always take pictures because I get too caught up in the moment painting. But this one was different…I hope you enjoy!

I thought it was pretty cool painting out of the ordinary.

The original painting became the underpainting.

Not too long ago, I took a painting workshop taught by the creative and talented artist Bonita Goldberg. The key approach in this workshop was to “put passion into your paintings.” She taught that the colors we use in our paintings can indicate emotion and passion. The yellow and blue painting you see here was the finished product from the workshop. I painted it from a reference photo I took while on Cumberland Island off the Georgia coast. The thrill of being there, the island and the marsh brought me “happiness, optimism and joy” indicated by the yellows in the sky. The blues represented “peace, calm and serenity.” All of the feelings associated with being in a beautiful place, with the person you want to be with.

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I was a little more than half way done at this point.

In the middle.

A few months passed and I kept looking at the painting. I liked it but always wanted to do more. Being such a realist, I decided to complete it with colors that were more like the true colors I saw. Once again, I went to my reference photo to get the needed information. I added some land and the clouds that were really there. I imagined, and then painted the storm in the background. 

Subtle Storm
framed oil on canvas. 11 x 14
$375 available

“Subtle Storm”.  It spoke, I listened.

“Subtle Storm” and it’s emotional underpainting seemed to create a glowing effect which surprised me. It’s as if I could hear the distant thunder and the gently rain in the background as I painted. What a gift to be happily surprised, letting the painting speak. I know, that’s strange, but that’s how I roll!

I used my artistic license when adding the few foreground flowers. The storm really didn’t exist, it most likely would have been seen as dark clouds with rain as the storm brewed in the distance. You notice these things when you’re an artist looking to observe truth in nature. Sometimes it’s fun to bend the truth and I can safely do that with a piece of art! I totally enjoyed the process, what a gift to be able to recreate and relive vivid, joyful and emotional moments in this life.

 

Prayerful Thoughts

Prayerful Thoughts, 18 x 20, framed oil on linen, $400

There she was, on her pedestal in that beautiful old cemetery. She was so mournful and so beautiful at the same time with her wreath in hand and I was so compelled to paint her. She had no name attached as a monument to the loved one that she represented. She just knelt there, outside the chapel forever mourning the one she had lost.

“Prayerful Thoughts”, isn’t that the silent attitude that is evoked when we grace the entrance to a cemetery? It is the peaceful reverence for those that have gone on to the unseen place that we know truly exists. It is the knowing that the other side is real because we all love and have known so many that have gone on before us. And love will never ever die, because it continues to live on in us for those that have gone on before. We also know that we too must go on and one day we will, it is a fact.

She is painted in oil on an 18″ x 20″ linen canvas, so fitting for what she represents. And she still brings a sense of peace, even as she mourns on my studio wall.

I hope that I have not alarmed you with my sense of bereavement, it’s just that old cemeteries and old statues bring that out in me, and they are beautiful.

Winter has taken a toll, even on my thoughts and attitude and I think it is time for spring to arrive. It is time for my “prayerful thoughts” to be centered on the resurrection of Christ, the most important event that is celebrated in all of time. My next blog post will be more on that cheerful note! In the meantime, Christ died even for you, take Him at His word, He will never fail you.

“For God so loved the world that He gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believes in Him shall not perish but have eternal life.” John 3:16

Anne’s Geraniums

Anne’s Geraniums, 9 x 12, framed oil on canvas, $375

Here are Anne’s geraniums, and you might ask, who is Anne? You know… Anne (the Anne with an e) Shirley, of “Anne of Green Gables” fame. If you’ve read the book or seen the movie (preferably the movie made in 1985), how could you not have fallen in love with it? Our entire family did just that and we have watched it over and over and over again on our original and antiquated VCR tapes.  We’re enraptured with emotion every time  Anne and Matthew take the buggy ride to Green Gables through “White Way Delight” and have shed a tear every time Matthew dies. And oh, the music……!

I have visited the Green Gables home on Prince Edward Island in Canada two times. Most recently the summer of 2017 with my daughter and three oldest granddaughters. We drove up through rural Maine and into rural Canada for quite some time, then onto the island via the giant 8 mile long bridge across the Northumberland Strait. The original 1996 trip had no bridge, you had to swim…jk….we took a car ferry to the island. 🙂

If you aren’t familiar with the story, author Lucy Maude Montgomery wrote the Anne Of Green Gables novel in 1908. In real life, Green Gables was the home of her cousins where she spent much of her childhood. In the book it is portrayed as the home of middle age siblings Matthew and Marilla Cuthbert. Anne was an orphan who was adopted by Matthew and Marilla, who thought they were getting a boy, and the story begins on that note.

So we took a lovely tour of Green Gables. Walking through the historical house, there on the kitchen windowsill stood the two pots of geraniums, most likely just as Anne had left them. The sun had cast itself through the window onto the cheerful bright red flowers. Those flowers paired with the brilliant spring green leaves made them appear as thin florescent tissue paper, simply happy to be who they were created to be in all their beauty.

I chose oil paints as my medium to paint the living bouquet in the window. My favorite part to paint was the reflective light of the sun shining on the right side of the window and the windowsill. I truly didn’t see it when I started the painting, how exciting it was to find the reflection as I painted and studied the photo! It was nice to reconnect with the feelings I had when I originally saw the flowers at Green Gables that day. I enjoy the challenge of recreating an event, a time or a place, an experience that evokes meaning to me.  This connection materializes memories that make me thankful to be able to share the gift that I have and therefore hopefully create a sense of joy to the viewer.

I wonder if Anne would have named the painting “Anne’s Geraniums”, I doubt it. She probably would have called it “Glorious Light Of Splendor” or “Stained Glass Sunshine”, something a little more dramatic. I simply wanted this painting to remind me of my time on the island with my girls and all of the interesting and unique Anne experiences we had that week in July, the summer of 2017.

There are more Prince Edward Island paintings to come, some in pastel, some in oils. We also made a stop at Acadia National Park on the way home, many oceans are waiting to be painted! I am willing to part with this painting, as attached as I am. I paint because I want to, I also paint to make the viewer happy. Contact me if you are interested in letting this painting make you, or someone you love, happy!

 

Crimson Farm

Crimson Farm, 12 x 6, framed oil on panel, $250

This is Crimson Farm. It is an old place that was up the road when we lived close to Caesar Creek State Park. It still stands but at one time it was a beauty, at least I thought so even in it’s slightly raggedy condition. It was beginning to show some wear and grow weeds all around so I thought I had better get in the car, get up there and take a photo before it was too late.

Later in the studio, it was especially fun to paint with the reds, pale greens and faded blue sky. The photo was taken on a sunny day which washed out most of the natural color, all except the barn and silos which helps make them the standout in their worn out condition. I used oil paints and a palette knife to paint with instead of a brush which gives the painting so much texture. A palette knife is very freeing, especially for someone like me who likes to pick out and include every detail in a picture and include those details in a painting.

Another interesting aspect of this painting is the fact that I used a Masonite panel as my support which was painted with hot pink gesso (which I mixed up myself). If you look close enough you will find little sparks of hot pink that pop out from beneath. Some might say “what is that?”  This little painting measures a mere 12″ x 6″ and is set in a wooden frame that blends with the deep red of the barn. It hangs in my living room for the time being, is quite lovely and is for sale (if you are interested or would like to look simply contact me).

This old barn and these silos don’t necessarily have a dramatic story to go along with them, at least from my point of view, but I am sure that they’ve seen enough life of their own, if this old farm could talk.