Joy Of The Earth

Joy Of The Earth, 12 x 16, Pastel on board, $350

Day after day, the relentless call came to me “Look over here, create !” I was possessed by the early morning scene that stretched across the eastern sky each day on my walk and the earlier I went out, the more beautiful it became. The yellows and oranges were bursting as the fog gently hovered just above the damp ground on each cool mid-spring morning. After a few days I succumbed to the call.

I had a piece of board in the studio that I had hand primed with a burgundy pastel primer and had been waiting for the right time to put into use. I spent about 5 days working on this pastel painting, but four days out of the five I had truly decided in the middle of the night to fold it up and just throw it away. “Just be done-give it up, throw it away!” the night voices would tell me. But my heart spoke another song, the same song it spoke when the scene called my name, so I persevered.

And on the last day, as the scene then became the painting, it spoke again, this time in silence. I added the final touches and walked away.

Prayerful Thoughts

Prayerful Thoughts, 18 x 20, framed oil on linen, $400

There she was, on her pedestal in that beautiful old cemetery. She was so mournful and so beautiful at the same time with her wreath in hand and I was so compelled to paint her. She had no name attached as a monument to the loved one that she represented. She just knelt there, outside the chapel forever mourning the one she had lost.

“Prayerful Thoughts”, isn’t that the silent attitude that is evoked when we grace the entrance to a cemetery? It is the peaceful reverence for those that have gone on to the unseen place that we know truly exists. It is the knowing that the other side is real because we all love and have known so many that have gone on before us. And love will never ever die, because it continues to live on in us for those that have gone on before. We also know that we too must go on and one day we will, it is a fact.

She is painted in oil on an 18″ x 20″ linen canvas, so fitting for what she represents. And she still brings a sense of peace, even as she mourns on my studio wall.

I hope that I have not alarmed you with my sense of bereavement, it’s just that old cemeteries and old statues bring that out in me, and they are beautiful.

Winter has taken a toll, even on my thoughts and attitude and I think it is time for spring to arrive. It is time for my “prayerful thoughts” to be centered on the resurrection of Christ, the most important event that is celebrated in all of time. My next blog post will be more on that cheerful note! In the meantime, Christ died even for you, take Him at His word, He will never fail you.

“For God so loved the world that He gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believes in Him shall not perish but have eternal life.” John 3:16

Crimson Farm

Crimson Farm, 12 x 6, framed oil on panel, $250

This is Crimson Farm. It is an old place that was up the road when we lived close to Caesar Creek State Park. It still stands but at one time it was a beauty, at least I thought so even in it’s slightly raggedy condition. It was beginning to show some wear and grow weeds all around so I thought I had better get in the car, get up there and take a photo before it was too late.

Later in the studio, it was especially fun to paint with the reds, pale greens and faded blue sky. The photo was taken on a sunny day which washed out most of the natural color, all except the barn and silos which helps make them the standout in their worn out condition. I used oil paints and a palette knife to paint with instead of a brush which gives the painting so much texture. A palette knife is very freeing, especially for someone like me who likes to pick out and include every detail in a picture and include those details in a painting.

Another interesting aspect of this painting is the fact that I used a Masonite panel as my support which was painted with hot pink gesso (which I mixed up myself). If you look close enough you will find little sparks of hot pink that pop out from beneath. Some might say “what is that?”  This little painting measures a mere 12″ x 6″ and is set in a wooden frame that blends with the deep red of the barn. It hangs in my living room for the time being, is quite lovely and is for sale (if you are interested or would like to look simply contact me).

This old barn and these silos don’t necessarily have a dramatic story to go along with them, at least from my point of view, but I am sure that they’ve seen enough life of their own, if this old farm could talk.

Through My Garden Gate

Through My Garden Gate, framed oil on panel, 9 x 14, $295

Through My Garden Gate was the gift of time to myself on my birthday in August, 2017. I put everything aside for a couple of hours that day to paint outside (plein-air) in oils for the gift.  Stepping outside my back door, I grabbed my palette, brushes, a palette knife and paints, set up my easel and began to paint, looking through my garden gate where an old Hydrangea bush grows. The bugs were atrocious, I believe there could be some embedded in the painting. I did not finish it that day.

A few years ago, my daughter had a stack of things to take to Goodwill and a book called “The Voice Of Creation” by Thomas Kincade was part of the stack. I have a little bookshelf in my studio and this book was to become part the collection for my library. Interestingly, this book does not contain the usual pretty “light in the window” paintings that Kincade is known for, but it contains beautiful natural landscapes he had painted “plein-air”. They were painted very loosely with much paint texture and you could also see the grid like texture of the canvas from underneath. This is what caught my eye and I wanted to paint my garden gate like that. Waiting for the perfect day to paint, I had previously prepared a Masonite panel for this purpose by flipping it on the wrong side and painting gesso over the rough grid like wrong side. This would be what I painted on and that roughness was the challenge I was looking for.

I finished the painting in my studio this past February, 2018 using a photo I had taken on my birthday. The reflection of light and texture shines on the photo of my painting but you get the idea. It is framed and hangs in my studio…and as you can see, it is for sale.

Jody’s First Blog

It’s sort of like that blank canvas or piece of drawing paper and you tell yourself “Ok, let’s go, you can do this…just do it!” That’s what I felt like several days ago when I set out to write a blog in order to share my collection of paintings and drawings with anyone willing to stop, look and listen. Do you know how many times I have trashed blog startups due brain freeze and being downright frightened to put this out there? I’m sure you can relate. Also, trying to maneuver around and edit a website is another joy, I’d rather be painting!

But I’ll keep these posts simple, just the way we all like it…

Here goes:
Late Summer Sunrise, 8.5 x 10 image, framed pastel on textured paper, $285

It began at 7 a.m. on clear Sunday morning, late summer 2017, a few days after my art friend Lorri Davis had visited. (She always inspires me. We sit for hours usually outside, have lunch and talk art.) Inspired, I decided to set out on a short trek from home with my easel, drawing board, pastels and paper in hand. I walked down to a little dip in the road where a beautiful little valley lies with all kinds of brush, a few trees and wild things growing all about. Occasionally the cows come roaming through which they did that morning! But cows are for another painting on another day. Anyway, it was a perfect morning to be outside. I spent about an hour there, the sun was waking up the day and all of the shadows and light had changed, it was time to go home. I finished “Late Summer Sunrise” in the studio a couple of weeks later. It was so much fun to create that I decided to frame it and enter it into the Middletown Arts Center Area Artist juried art competition last fall. It won 3rd place in the drawing division!